Welcome to the Michigan Senate Republican Blog!

Thank you for visiting our blog. Our goal is to highlight the lives the Senate Republicans and their work on issues facing our state. It will feature videos, photos, graphics and first-person articles — posted on a regular basis — that will help keep you informed and give you an unprecedented look into the men and women of the Senate Republican caucus.

National Anthem Day

Written by Francis Scott Key, the Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States of America. On National Anthem Day, we celebrate and honor this song.

Congress creates second national park – Mackinac Island

Mackinac National Park, created in 1875 in response to the growing popularity of the island as a summer resort following the civil war, was the second national park of the United States and created so as to give tourists a chance to vacation on the island despite the U.S. military presence and use of the island.

In 1895 the fort was decommissioned and, at the request of the Michigan Governor John T. Rich, the park and fort was turned over to the state of Michigan, becoming Mackinac Island State Park, the first state park in Michigan.

Consumer Protection Week (3/5 – 3/11)

The health and stability of Michigan’s economy is dependent on the agriculture sector. Much of Michigan’s economy is based on industries that have strong adverse reactions to economic downturns. Due to the fact that food is a necessity, the food and agriculture system is more resistant. As the pioneer land-grant university, Michigan State University plays a vital role in agricultural health and research for the state of Michigan.

Agriculture and Natural Resources Week (ANR Week) continues to be one of the largest events of its kind in the nation. Foundations for the week were laid by the Farmers’ Institute more than a century ago. In 1898, Michigan Agricultural College hosted the first statewide Farmers’ Institute “Round-Up.” Agriculture Hall was completed in 1909, and a fourth floor auditorium provided the meeting place. Five years later, the round-up combined with farm association meetings to become the first Farmers Week. In 1982, Farmers Week was renamed Farmers’ Week and Natural Resources Days followed in 1985 by a name change to Agriculture and Natural Resources Week, better known today as ANR Week. With more than 50 programs and annual association meetings, ANR Week has developed into a late winter gathering of minds deeply concerned and involved in the today’s world of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Topics of interest have changed with the industry over the past century to coincide with trends and technology from machine based farming equipment to chemical and biological advances, and commodity specialization. Themes have also changed to reflect the times; during the 1960s the space age was topical, the 1970s featured science and cybernetics, and the 1980s bought forth issues related to world hunger.

Women of Aviation Worldwide Week (3/6 – 3/12)

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week is a global outreach initiative that takes place annually during the week of March 8, anniversary date of the world’s first female pilot license since 1910 and International Women’s Day since 1914. The week is designed to raise awareness of aviation opportunities available to girls of all ages while celebrating the accomplishments of past and present women of aviation.

Ag & Natural Resources Week at MSU (3/4 – 3/11)

The health and stability of Michigan’s economy is dependent on the agriculture sector. Much of Michigan’s economy is based on industries that have strong adverse reactions to economic downturns. Due to the fact that food is a necessity, the food and agriculture system is more resistant. As the pioneer land-grant university, Michigan State University plays a vital role in agricultural health and research for the state of Michigan.

Agriculture and Natural Resources Week (ANR Week) continues to be one of the largest events of its kind in the nation. Foundations for the week were laid by the Farmers’ Institute more than a century ago. In 1898, Michigan Agricultural College hosted the first statewide Farmers’ Institute “Round-Up.” Agriculture Hall was completed in 1909, and a fourth floor auditorium provided the meeting place. Five years later, the round-up combined with farm association meetings to become the first Farmers Week. In 1982, Farmers Week was renamed Farmers’ Week and Natural Resources Days followed in 1985 by a name change to Agriculture and Natural Resources Week, better known today as ANR Week. With more than 50 programs and annual association meetings, ANR Week has developed into a late winter gathering of minds deeply concerned and involved in the today’s world of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Topics of interest have changed with the industry over the past century to coincide with trends and technology from machine based farming equipment to chemical and biological advances, and commodity specialization. Themes have also changed to reflect the times; during the 1960s the space age was topical, the 1970s featured science and cybernetics, and the 1980s bought forth issues related to world hunger.

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.”  Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.”

In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.”  Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month.  Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

Lansing is home to the Michigan Women’s Historical Center and the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame.

The Michigan Women’s Historical Center is the only museum in Michigan dedicated to women’s history.

The Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame was established in 1983 and honors the achievements of remarkable Michigan women.

 

First Telegraph Sent – Michigan Firsts

The telegraph, invented by Samuel Morse in 1844, was a communication breakthrough that allowed news to spread almost instantaneously.

Four years following the invention of the telegraph, Detroit sent its first message to Buffalo, NY and by 1860 most large cities in the Lower Peninsula had telegraph service.

Red Cross Month

Now over 150 years old, the Red Cross movement was first conceptualized by Jean Henri Dunant in 1859 after having witnessed The Battle of Solferino in which some 40,000 soldiers were killed or wounded in a single day. In a book he published in 1862 that recounted his observations, titled “A Memory of Solferino,” Dunant suggested creating “permanent societies of volunteers who in time of war would give help to the wounded without regard to their nationality.” The vision for the Red Cross, championed by Gustave Moynier of the Geneva Public Welfare Society, became a reality the following year.

It would not be for another 18 years, however, until the American Red Cross chapter would be founded by Clara Barton in 1881. Regarded as “The Angel of the Battlefield” during the American Civil War for locating and nursing over 1,000 missing soldiers, Barton became the first president of the American Red Cross serving for over two decades.

Today, the Red Cross is a nationwide network consisting of more than 650 chapters, 36 blood services, 500,000 volunteers, and 30,000 employees who annually mobilize relief to people affected by disasters across the globe.

March is Reading Month

March is celebrated as National Reading Month as a time to encourage children of all ages to pick up a book and read.

Each year at the beginning of March, school children kick off National Reading Month by celebrating the birthday of Dr. Seuss! Teachers will design contests, family literacy events, and even pajama and pillow days to provide cozy mornings of uninterrupted reading.

Reading is vital to a successful education and lays the foundation to a rewarding future. Learning to read at a young age has been shown to increase a student’s ability to remember facts, comprehend information and be successful in both school and his or her career.

JFK creates the Peace Corp

Originally proposed in 1960 in a 2 a.m. impromptu presidential campaign speech, then presidential hopeful John F. Kennedy challenged 5,000 students at the University of Michigan to contribute two years of their lives to help people in countries of the developing world.

Created in 1961 by executive order 10924 issued by President John Kennedy, the Peace Corps is a volunteer program run by the United States government that is responsible for providing technical assistance to developing countries, helping people outside the United States understand American culture, and helping Americans to understand the cultures of other counties.

Since that speech, nearly 220,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in over 140 counties.